1 Samuel 25:36–42, Luke 22:39–46, James 1:13–15

Temptation is a tricky thing. It can seem easy to succumb to, and it is. It can also be easy to beat yourself up should you fall to temptation. In many respects, after the failure, it is the mind game you play with yourself afterward that sets you up for future success or failure.

The first response by many is…it’s God’s fault. That could be a twisted understanding of God made me this way (so, whenever I sin, It’s God’s fault). There is also a thought that God is the one tempting me (and he knows that I’ll fail, so it’s God’s fault).

As David notes, God does provide a way (or more than one!) to avoid temptation. Sometimes we are blind to it. Sometimes we deliberately ignore it. We have free will. We do have a choice.

Temptation will come. Jesus was tempted in all ways like us (not necessarily the same expression). You are not better than Jesus. It is what you do before and after temptation, and after failing that sets you up for maturing further in the Christian faith.

1) Do you have anyone that holds you accountable? Are you holding anyone accountable?

2) After a failure, how do you (or do you) confess? Do you include others in your confession?

3) Before and after temptation, how do you bolster your strength to resist?

Pastor Ian

Ian is an ordained Elder in The Church of the Nazarene, and is currently serving as the Online Campus Pastor at