Psalm 77; Job 5:8–27; 1 Peter 3:8–18a

Shun . That seems straightforward. However, we human beings often make it far too complicated. Or, even worse, we make it about others.

The Christian life is not about others; it is about us. What we do, as the household of God, matters. Far too many people have taken words like Peter’s and turned them into bludgeons and daggers. People have taken these words and applied them to a world that is perishing. Instead, these words apply to us so that we do not continue down the road of the perishing.

Part of the en “spirit” is the awareness of our mortality. In the COVID era, we are probably a bit more aware of it than we would “normally” be. Barring wartime, there isn’t as much of a focus on our imminent demise as there is now.

Perhaps the church ought to be praising God for a whole year of , though that doesn’t make it easy. Our mortality, organization mortality, operational mortality, the death of normal have all come. Small Businesses had struggled. Some have died. This is not something to be happy about. Many (but not all) big companies have become stronger. Again, though, isn’t about business (though businesses like to sell it).

Shunning and facing mortality () is for us.

Yes, we want the world to come to know and follow Jesus! Much of our worldliness needs to die for that to happen. Perhaps the deepest and hardest struggle we Christians have is, what of our worldliness needs to die?

※Reflection※

  • What worldliness of yours needs to die?
  • If you are on social media, look at what you share and like. Is it Christ-honoring/following, or is it worldly?
  • How do evaluate what is worldliness and what isn’t? Does your understanding match that of others? Why does it matter? Why doesn’t it matter?

※Prayer※

Lord, we know that our sin was nailed upon the cross. Help us discern the worldliness in our lives that needs to go with our sin. Amen.

Pastor Ian

Ian is an ordained Elder in The Church of the Nazarene, and is currently serving as the Online Campus Pastor at